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Mustard Apricots
makes about 1.5kg keep indefinitely…as if!!
editor’s note — my sincere apologies there was an omission of dry mustard powder in this recipe and whilst it still tasted good it lacked the bite. AO 14 July 2011

We have always made our own cheat’s mustard fruits but the recent visit of chefs Tina and Neil Jewell from the South African Le Quartier Francais, Bread and Wine for cooking classes at River Cafè has inspired an amalgamation of both recipes for a superior recipe. Be warned they are very delicious and although they will keep indefinitely they seem to vanish.

as a sidethe recent visit of Tina and Neil Jewell le Quartier Français restaurant Bread and Wine further reinforces my belief that chefs who hand over their recipes and turn up for the dinner, one do not give a toss about food, two take no responsibility for educating the next generation of chefs and three think the dining customers are idiots! The wonderful flow through of having two great chefs work with the staff at River Cafè is bleedingly obvious and what having a guest chef should be about. Just a small example, head chef at River Cafè Sarah Contin’s special this week, Salad of roasted pork loin, stuffed with Neil Jewell’s boudin noir and served with mustard apricots…delicious! food editor AO

JUMP TO where to buy in South Australia

1kg local dried apricots
1kg filtered water
apricot water
50g hot mustard powder
100g honey
500g caster sugar
100g whole grain mustard
2 bay leaves
350g Vine Valley white wine vinegar

Method One — for very nice squishy dried apricots
Remembering that this mix with boil double it’s cold height weigh the water into a saucepan and whisk in the dry mustard, and then weigh in the honey, sugar, wholegrain mustard and vinegar and add the bay leaves.

Place the pot on high heat and stir until the sugar is dissolved. Simmer on very low heat for about 5 minutes until it starts to thicken, add the apricots stir over and bring back to the boil, them immediately turn the heat off. Store in sterilised glass jars or vac in convenient weights.

Method two — for very dry, dried apricots
Put the apricots in the water and set a timer for 30 minutes. Reserving the liquid strain it off. Remembering that this mix with boil double it’s cold height weigh the apricot water into a saucepan and top it to 1kg, whisk in the dry mustard, and then weigh in the honey, sugar, wholegrain mustard and vinegar and add the bay leaves.

Place the pot on high heat and stir until the sugar is dissolved. Simmer on very low heat for about 5 minutesuntil it starts to thicken, add the apricots and stir over and bring back to the boil, them immediately turn the heat off. Store in sterilised glass jars or vac in convenient weights.

serving suggestions
Poached or roasted chicken, corned beef and roast pork belly.

tip — the resulting marinade juices are really delicious so you might like to double the marinade and harvest most of it to use a dressing or sauce. We knocked some into a light chicken glaze and…yumbo!

in South Australia — we buy our dried apricots from Kathy and David Liersch Barossans doing things the right way $18 per kilo + delivery – t 8563 9064 – m +61 419 187 312 – email railie@chariot.net.au


the people behind Galaxy Guidesfood editor and publisher
Ann Oliver
food-editor@galaxyguides.com

champagne editor
Kaaren Palmer
kaaren.palmer@galaxyguides.com

Contibutors

Jan Bowman
Political comentator, briliant photographer…farmers’s market obsessed…Brisbane based.

Olivia Stratton Makris
Masters of Gastronomy, NYC, Spain and constant assistance and editorial suggestion…Adelaide based.

Michael Martin…Northern America 2016.Photographic assistance Kym Martin…Adelaide based.

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